Stress Fracture | Arthroscopic Surgery | Shoulder Arthroscopy | Long Island | Smithtown
Stress Fracture | Arthroscopic Surgery | Shoulder Arthroscopy | Long Island | Smithtown Stress Fracture | Arthroscopic Surgery | Shoulder Arthroscopy | Long Island | Smithtown
Stress Fracture | Arthroscopic Surgery | Shoulder Arthroscopy | Long Island | Smithtown
Sports Medicine | Arthroscopy | Joint Pain | Long Island | Smithtown
Stuart B Cherney | Orthopaedic Surgery | Sports Medicine | Long Island | Smithtown
Physical Therapy | Arthroscopy | Shoulder Surgery | Long Island | Smithtown
Orthopaedic Resources | Sports Medicine | Long Island | Smithtown
Stress Fracture | Arthroscopic Surgery | Shoulder Arthroscopy | Long Island | Smithtown
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290 East Main Street | Suite 700 | Smithtown, NY 11787 | (631) 361-7867

  1. What is Arthroscopic Surgery?
  2. What Causes Knee Problems?
  3. How Are Knee Problems Diagnosed?
  4. What Types of Problems Can Be Treated With Shoulder Arthroscopy?
  5. What Causes a Stress Fracture?
  6. What are PRP injections (Platelet Rich Plasma)?
  7. What is Hyaluronic Acid (HA) injections?

What is Arthroscopic Surgery?
Prior to 1970 most joint surgery required large incisions and a prolonged recovery.  Fortunately, arthroscopic surgery has completely changed the way joint injuries are treated.

With the aid of an arthroscope, Dr. Cherney can easily examine, diagnose, and treat joint problems which, in earlier years, may have been extremely difficult to even identify.

The arthroscope is a small fiber-optic viewing instrument made up of a tiny lens, light source and video camera. The surgical instruments used in arthroscopic surgery are very small (only 3 to 5 mm. in diameter), but are designed to present a magnified picture.

The surgeon inserts the arthroscope into the joint through a tiny incision (about 1/4 of an inch) called a portal. Other portals are used for the insertion of surgical instruments. With small incision sites and direct access to most areas of the joint, the surgeon can diagnose and correct a wide variety of problems such as arthritis and ligament tears. Arthroscopy can also be used in conjunction with open procedures, such as an Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Reconstruction, as well as procedures dealing with the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and ankle.

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What Causes Knee Problems?
There are two general kinds of knee problems: Traumatic and inflammatory.

Traumatic Knee Problems

Some knee problems result from a single injury, such as a direct blow or sudden force that shifts the knee beyond its normal range of movement. Other problems, such as osteoarthritis, result from years of wear and tear on the articular cartilage. 

Inflammatory Knee Problems

Inflammation that occurs in certain rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, can damage the knee.

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How Are Knee Problems Diagnosed?
Doctors use several methods to diagnose knee problems.

Medical history--The patient tells the doctor details about symptoms and about any injury, condition, or general health issues that might be related to the the problem.

Physical examination--The doctor manipulates and palpates the knee to assess motion, laxity, function and location of pain.  The patient may be asked to stand, walk or squat to help the doctor assess the knee's function.

Diagnostic tests--Dr. Cherney uses a variety tests to determine the nature of a knee problem.

  • X-ray (radiography)--An x-ray beam is passed through the knee to produce a two-dimensional picture of the bones.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)--Energy from a powerful magnet (rather than x-ray) stimulates knee tissue to produce signals that are detected by a scanner and analyzed by a computer. This creates a series of cross-sectional images of a specific part of the knee. An MRI is particularly useful for detecting meniscus, ligament, soft tissue damage or disease. Like a CAT scan, a computer is used to produce the images of the knee during MRI.
  • Arthroscopy--The doctor manipulates a small, lighted optic tube (arthroscope) that has been inserted into the joint through a small incision in the knee. At this point, the entire joint is inspected. Direct visualization is sometimes necessary for an accurate diagnosis prior to any additional treatment.
  • Bone scan (radionuclide scanning)--A very small amount of radioactive material is injected into the patient's bloodstream and detected by a scanner. This test detects blood flow and bone activity. It can help detect bone tumors, infection and occult fractures. 
  • Computerized axial tomography (CAT) scan
    --X-rays lasting a fraction of a second are passed through the knee at different angles, detected by a scanner, and analyzed by a computer. This produces a series of clear cross-sectional images ("slices") of the knee on a computer screen. CAT scan images show bone and soft tissue detail -- more clearly than conventional x rays. The computer can combine individual images to give a three-dimensional view of the knee.
  • Arthrogram--A small amount of dye is introduced into the joint prior to an x-ray or CT scan.  This results in better outlining and detail in the films.

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Stress Fracture | Arthroscopic Surgery | Shoulder Arthroscopy | Long Island | Smithtown What types of problems can be treated with shoulder arthroscopy?
Stress Fracture | Arthroscopic Surgery | Shoulder Arthroscopy | Long Island | Smithtown
  1. Rotator Cuff Tear
  2. Acromioclavicular (AC) Degenerative Joint Disease / Tear AC Meniscus
  3. Labral Tear
  4. Instability
  5. AC Sprain
  6. Impingement Syndrome

Rotator Cuff Tear:  The rotator cuff is a group of muscles that allows specific movements of the shoulder.  Injury to the rotator cuff can cause weakness, pain and loss of motion.  Due to the fact that complete tears to the rotator cuff do not mend themselves, surgery may be indicated.  Rotator cuff repair is the closure of the tear which usually includes re-attachment of the rotator cuff back to its insertion on the humeral head.  Special arthroscopically inserted suture anchors facilitate the repair of the rotator cuff to the bone.

Acromioclavicular Degenerative Joint Disease / AC Meniscus Tear:  Arthritis or damage to the meniscus cartilage in the AC joint causes pain.  Pain mostly occurs with overhead motions and movements across the body.  Arthroscopic surgery  includes shaving a small portion off the distal clavicle to make room in the joint and to remove torn meniscus cartilage.

Labral Tear: Tear of the cartilage rim.  The shoulder is a ball and socket joint the glenohumeral joint.  The labrum is a cartilage rim that encircles the socket (glenoid) providing depth resulting in increased stability for the shoulder.  A Labral tear may result from a single injury or chronic overuse.  Repair of the torn labrum can be performed arthroscopically.  This allows many athletes a safe and predictable return to sports.

Instability:  Abnormal joint motion caused by trauma (dislocation/subluxation) or associated with generalized joint laxity.  When increased laxity around the shoulder causes symptoms or recurrent dislocations, surgery may be recommended, to tighten the ligaments around the shoulder.

Acromioclavicular Sprain (Shoulder separation): Separation of the clavicle (collarbone) relative to the scapula (shoulder blade). These separations are graded I – VI.  A small percentage of separations may require surgery to relocate the joint and repair the ligaments that have been torn during the injury.  A simple shaving of the clavicle tip may eliminate pain.

Impingement Syndrome / Shoulder Bursitis:  A painful process caused by inflammation of the rotator cuff and the bursa that lies above it. If anti-inflammatory medication, rest, therapeutic exercise and cortisone injections (possibly  have failed) to relieve symptoms, surgery may be recommended.  Arthroscopy increases the space available for the rotator cuff by shaving the acromion and removing inflamed bursa.

 

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Stress Fracture | Arthroscopic Surgery | Shoulder Arthroscopy | Long Island | Smithtown What Causes a Stress Fracture?
Stress Fracture | Arthroscopic Surgery | Shoulder Arthroscopy | Long Island | Smithtown Stress fractures are microscopic fractures of bone resulting from repeated low level trauma which weakens the bone to the point of injury. Stress fractures of the feet -- which is where they occur most often -- are related to long walking, running or other athletic activities.  However, stress fractures can occur in other bones of the lower leg as well as the upper extremities.

Unlike typical fractures, which involve bones snapping in two, stress fracture are microscopic cracks that are often too tiny to show up on a routine x-ray.  MRI or bone scans are often needed to make the diagnosis.

 

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Stress Fracture | Arthroscopic Surgery | Shoulder Arthroscopy | Long Island | Smithtown

What are PRP injections (Platelet Rich Plasma)?

Stress Fracture | Arthroscopic Surgery | Shoulder Arthroscopy | Long Island | Smithtown PRP is a treatment that uses your own healing properties to help recover from many injuries acute or chronic.  PRP uses platelets present in your blood, to promote healing to the injured body part.  Platelets are cell fragments that circulate in our blood.  They contain many growth factors that play an important role in repairing and healing connective tissue.  Injured or inflamed ligaments and tendons, as well as some joint disorders can benefit from PRP injections.  Please visit our blog for more on PRP.
 

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Stress Fracture | Arthroscopic Surgery | Shoulder Arthroscopy | Long Island | Smithtown What is Hyaluronic Acid (HA) injections?
Stress Fracture | Arthroscopic Surgery | Shoulder Arthroscopy | Long Island | Smithtown HA injections are treatment options offered to patients who suffer from osteoarthritis of the knee primarily.  It is used to treat pain stemming from articular cartilage wear and tear.  HA is a natural substance found in the fluid that circulates a healthy knee. HA provides lubrication and cushioning to the knee.  Ha is injected into the knee to help replenish the HA and acts to diminish pain and inflammatory symptoms.  Up to 75 percent of patients receiving HA will obtain a decrease in pain levels.

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Stress Fracture | Arthroscopic Surgery | Shoulder Arthroscopy | Long Island | Smithtown
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Stuart B. Cherney of All-Sport Orthopaedic Surgery provides board-certified care for sports injuries.
Serving Long Island, Port Jefferson, Huntington NY, Smithtown, Commack, Stony Brook, Kings Park, Lake Grove, Setauket, St James NY, Port Jefferson Station, and the surrounding areas.
290 East Main Street | Suite 700 | Smithtown, NY 11787 | (631) 361-7867
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